Tag Archives: world citizens

Think! Think! Think!

What is the wise thing to do as far as this serious crisis in Syria?  More killing?  Name calling–labeling people as hawks or doves?  Please!  Think more deeply than that–and I mean President Obama, those in Congress, American citizens and all world citizens, even Assad.
    Revenge is a negative value–one to be shunned.  None of those gassed will be brought back to life by military action by the United States, especially ill-advised if we act unilaterally.  And there can be no assurance that military action by us now will prevent the use of chemical weapons in the future, for instance by Russia.
    The United States must stand for positive wisdom-associated values: empathy toward the millions in distress in Syria, particularly the five million refugees within Syria and the two million outside of that suffering nation; truth and honesty through the world media to all world citizens concentrating not on retribution, but rather the terrible gassing of civilians; justice of a restorative nature rather than a retributive; cooperation by all world citizens to bring this whole Syrian debacle to a peaceful and compassionate conclusion with patience and world opinion, I emphasize-by Syrians; universal well-being in reaching out to those living in Syria and those refugees outside of that nation; and creativity in seeking non-military solutions, especially in the public debates.  This should not boil down to military action or not; instead, use creativity outside of military action.  Lastly, let’s learn a whole lot more about Syria.
    There are negative values also at play in this Syrian drama.  Assad is obviously extremely selfish and most probably filled with hate, greed, envy and revenge.  But we do not have to sink to his level.  Again, revenge will not bring back the dead victims or guarantee the absence of such weapons in the future.
    We should reach to our most creative minds; not just in the United States, but throughout the globe, for non-military solutions.  We must focus–not just shoot!  Our nation must conduct our affairs–especially those involving life and death through military action–with deep wisdom.  We should not just focus on the military considerations.  There are economic consequences too–some that may be life and death for abjectly poor world citizens.    Let’s be creative.  Remember what Gandhi said, “Violence begets violence.”  I say, “Kindness begets kindness.”
   We should reach out to all the Syrian refugees and help them.  That would be a compassionate act.  This reminds me of Hurricane Katrina and the help so many private citizens and spiritual entities gave to New Orleans and the Gulf Coast following that catastrophe.  Thanks again to all of you.  Let’s reach out–within and without the government–to help these Syrian refugees.  Nonviolence works much better than bombs.  Apply the same logic as was applied to the “refugees” of Katrina–reach out and offer aid again.
   Hatred must be dissolved by love.  That may sound sappy, soft and cowardly; but what does one promote, hatred and revenge?  I am a truth-seeker, and I implore the citizens of the world to join me in this quest.  Truth seeking, that’s all I ask.  But I realize that may be a lot if one is used to labeling, something that is happening constantly in ALL our media.  We all have a role–all world citizens–to go to the aid (humanitarian aid) of the Syrian refugees.  To me, that–especially in terms of numbers–is far more important and much less dangerous that military action by us.
   Let’s act like we did after World War II, helping–not killing.  The Marshall plan was so effective in assisting the developed world back to prosperity.  Then, in the 1980s, President Reagan with charm, style and very understated intelligence did so much.  What would President Reagan do now?  I believe he would proceed along the more peaceful path that I am recommending.
    Our role is not to be bystanders.  We are all world citizens and need to seek the truth, all the truths in Syria.  Politics and personalities should be put aside in life and death military actions, particularly in democracies.

Out of the 20th Century and Into the 21st Century

 I believe we should not respond immediately to the Syrian chemical genocide, but instead position such forces as necessary and await the next move of that terribly selfish and misguided dictator–Assad.  All the world citizens–including Assad himself–should realize chemical warfare or any violent actions other than self defense are outdated in the twenty-first century.
    Primitive notions of dictators, emperors and such are a dated relic of the past.  We have huge problems to solve (such as global warming and climate change, huge debts and obligations and terrorism).  Coping with civil war and chemical warfare should not be part of today’s human equation.
    World citizens arise–not with violence, but with the wrath of indignation to those who lack a worthwhile respect for other world citizens.
    Values, values, values; positive ones are critical while banishing the negative ones.  It’s a matter of life and death in Syria and other parts of the world right now.