Category Archives: Politics

John E. Wade II is very interested in, and has studied, political issues relating to the United States as well as the world. He is motivated to help provide his honest and open opinion on many matters relating to politics and isn’t afraid to speak his mind!

Prosperity and World Order

Kissinger entitled his book World Order, and immediately the book addresses the nonexistence of a real world order. After reading/reviewing/analyzing his book about five and a half times, I agree. I also agree with Kissinger about the desperate need for a world order in our society today.

We have been operating under a system that was devised after the Thirty Years War, which has broken down multiple times. As a result, sovereign nations have ruled from within by any means possible.

This system needs to be fixed. The way to do this is to move away from military balance and power, and instead move towards engendering business, sound banks, loving, spiritual entities, charities, and charitable foundations – striving for prosperity worldwide along with free, fair trade and free enterprise will move us toward world order.

Moving from the current non-world order to stable, robust, prosperous democracies in a non-violent way must involve a de-escalation of arms, especially in North Korea and Iran. Many will argue, “How does the world de-escalate globally while avoiding war?” Look to Gandhi’s non-violent methods as well as President Reagan’s tact.

No matter what, the United States direly needs to improve its economic situation. We desperately need a pro-business, nation-wide federal government, as we now have in thirty states guided by Republican governors.

President Reagan wanted to lower debt, but he was faced with a tax-and-spend Democratic Congress. He managed to lower taxes, but spending created a deficit. His deficit, however, was nothing like the one that President Obama has caused.

I disagree with the anti-American, anti-colonial thinking of President Obama. He has harmed us with onerous laws, regulations, and wrongful use of the Executive Branch, including the use of the IRS to win re-election.

REVIEW Part III: The Business Solution to Poverty: Designing Products and Services for Three Billion Customers

The Business Solution to Poverty:

Designing Products and Services for Three Billion Customers

By Paul Polak and Mal Walwick

Review By John E. Wade II

Part III

 

Part One

Only Business Can End Poverty

 

I agree quite fervently that only business can end poverty, not only in the Global South, which is the subject of this book, but that premise applies globally.  The authors describe examples of poor rural people; reading this is a must if you intend to get a serious idea of their life. There are a few general characteristics—“The poor just get by,” very much in a survival mode, “The poor receive little news.  Most of the information poor people receive comes by word of mouth from families, neighbors, and friends, and occasionally by radio, filtered through a village culture little influenced by national and global news.”

 

“The poor rarely travel.” They are isolated and are “…rarely aware of the new ideas and new opportunities that surface so frequently in today’s fast-changing world.”  “The poor have few choices.” The modern world is out of reach.  Instead “…one out of five of their infants die of preventable illness…They’re vulnerable to whatever else comes along in the village where they live, whether it’s inferior health care, substandard food, dangerous transportation, or illegal activities by the police or village officials.”

 

“The poor live with misfortune never far away.” Things from uncertain rainfall to children’s bouts of severe diarrhea surround the poor.  It’s not just because income is limited, but “…because what income they receive is irregular and unpredictable.”

 

The book provides some serious wisdom about this poverty in the chapter, “What is Poverty?”  “It’s shocking.  After the world’s rich nations invested more than $2.3 trillion over the past 60 years to end global poverty, billions of our fellow humans remain desperately poor…Top-down development programs administered by governments, international agencies, foundations, or big NGO, [Nonprofit Government Organizations] rarely work because they’re so vulnerable to government corruption, bureaucratic inaction, the distance between the planners and the supposed beneficiaries, and both distrust and a lack of interest on the part of people who live at the grass roots.”

 

“Giveaways breed dependence and self-doubt instead of change.  Philanthropy isn’t the answer, either.  Despite the severely limited funds available, they’re squandered on a great diversity of uncoordinated, small-scale efforts to address every problem under the sun.  We can’t donate our way out of poverty.  Even Bill Gates, with $70 billion at his disposal, has referred to his wealth as a drop in the bucket in our $70 trillion global economy.”

 

It is estimated that 925 million people go to bed hungry at night globally.  “Poor people as we have come to know them in the Global South typically experience un- or underemployment; encounter barriers to opportunity based on their gender, race, ethnicity, or religion; lack some or all of the basic human needs, including clean water, nutrition, health care, education, clothing, and shelter; and all too often, lose hope and lack even the most basic self-esteem.”  Surely we can do something about this.  The light at the end of the tunnel is, in my opinion, this book, and its application with determination and persistence.

 

The next chapter is, “What Can Government and Philanthropy Do?” Since World War II global GDP went from $4 trillion to $70 trillion in 2012.  The authors explain that the main improvements have been in public health and primary education.  And it is true that the percentage of the planet’s people living below subsistence level has decreased from about a half to thirty-eight percent.  But in absolute numbers of desperately poor people, there are more today (2.7 billion), than sixty years ago (2.6 billion).

 

United Nations aid (about $5 billion in 2012), non-military U.S. aid and other aid has had significant effect in particular places, but “their net effect on the incidence of global poverty is nil.”  The author’s Takeaway is “The most obvious, direct, and effective way to combat poverty is to enable poor people to earn more money.”  “Building infrastructure—the World Bank’s longtime favorite mission—allows top government officials to award construction contracts to their families, friends, and supporters, often with kickbacks in return.  Unfortunately, massive foreign aid is often diverted to armies and police forces to preserve the power and hidden bank accounts of ruling elites, to the disadvantage of the country’s poor people.”

 

There are more than five million citizen-based organizations globally which attempt to fight poverty.  While these efforts are earnest, admirable and effective, these organizations “…tend to be scattershot and are almost always on a small scale.  Scale is the overarching issue for the citizen sector.”  From time to time these groups develop effective ideas such as one which CARE introduced, a micro savings and loan program “…based on savings rather than debt and is managed by members of the community rather than professionals…These ‘village savings and loans’…now serve some six million people in 58 countries.”

 

Worldwide, microcredit is now considered “…one of the most favored methods undertaken to fight poverty.”  However, it appears that many in the “$70 billion microcredit industry, practice fraud, demand usurious interest rates (sometimes even greater than those of moneylenders), and in at least two celebrated cases have made huge fortunes for their investors at the expense of their clients.  In some countries, the results have been tragic: poor people overloaded with debt and nothing to show for it—and even, in one extreme case in India, a wave of dozens of suicides brought on by aggressive debt collectors.”  Even in Bangladesh—“home of the microcredit movement and the country where it has expanded the most”—the country has gone down on a UN measure of poverty from 136th in 1991 to 146th twenty years later.

 

But not all is bad news.  In health care, “The eradication of smallpox and the near elimination of polio, plus recent efforts to combat the spread of HIV/AIDS, have saved millions of lives and captured the public imagination.”  The authors laud the efforts of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in donating major sums of money to improve health care, “But so much more needs to be done!”

Education has been largely a success with literacy increasing significantly “…in recent decades in every region of the world.”  UNESCO estimates that world literacy went from about fifty-six percent in 1950 to eighty-two percent in 2000.  The authors explain, however, that schools in the Global South pay their teachers a pittance and have high teacher absenteeism.  These children do learn how to read and write in some fashion though.  The book encourages further efforts by governments in education, as there has been success previously, but states that better teacher salaries in the Global South would be helpful.

 

Other possible government advancements could be “…upgrading the legal system, expanding physical infrastructure, and improving business conditions.  In practice, making police and the courts accountable would be a big step forward.  Building more all-weather roads would help a lot, too.  And the thickets of often obscure laws and regulations that make establishing a business a months-long nightmare in many countries should be streamlined.”  Continuing, “in countries where they’re permitted (or can function under wraps where they’re not), citizen watchdog organizations can make a big difference by publicizing corruption, systematic uses of violence to stifle dissent, and other sins of government.  International organizations such as Human Rights Watch, Transparency International, and Amnesty International are excellent examples on the global scale.”

A New Approach to Assessing Candidates

So much—almost all—of the news about the Presidential campaign is about national and world issues. The irony is that from January 20, 2017 to January 20, 2021 our president will face unknown issues and widely varying issues from those known now.

So if we cannot judge a candidate based on their opinions on national and world issues, how then do we choose? My solution is to assess candidates not so much on their speaking ability or their position on the issues, but rather look at their lives, how they lived them, and especially their character and what they accomplished.

Scott Walker was a winner, having three gubernatorial victories in Wisconsin, one being making U. S. history as the first governor to win a recall election. Unfortunately, he dropped out of the race. I see this as a great loss for the Republican party and our nation, as I believed he could have followed in President Ronald Reagan’s footsteps.

Our nation can’t be strong militarily if it is not fiscally sound. We have a bloated federal government and entitlement that must be reformed in order to prevent us from evolving into a “Banana Republic” with such things as a currency crisis, inflation, and a Federal Reserve that has to print up money to avoid deflation and depression-like conditions.

Issues matter. But more important is to have a president who can solve these problems and who calls solving complex problems “fun.”

Though the challenges that Reagan faced are far different than what our country faces today, he is still an excellent role model for current presidents.

Issues matter. Electability matters. Governing matters. But wisdom, character, courage, leadership, innovation, life experiences—the whole life of all the candidates—matters more.

REVIEW Part II: The Business Solution to Poverty: Designing Products and Services for Three Billion Customers

The Business Solution to Poverty:

Designing Products and Services for Three Billion Customers

By Paul Polak and Mal Walwick

Review By John E. Wade II

Part II

 

Paul Polak, one of this book’s authors, wrote, Out of Poverty.  In it he explained how a market-driven nonprofit organization he founded in 1981, “…had lifted 17 million rural people into the middle class by rigorously applying practices they developed in the field in India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Somalia, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and new agricultural marketing practices—were revolutionary because they were market-driven and designed for and with $1-a-day farmers, and, not incidentally because they worked.”  There are approximately one billion people still living on $1 or less per day.  The authors spell it quite plainly, “…our primary concern in this book: a desire to eradicate poverty.”  I must explain that they are writing about dire poverty, $2 or less per day, not the comparative type of poverty which lingers in developed nations.

 

The authors explain, “…traditionally, capitalist approaches have exploited poor people and done irreparable harm to the environment.  But what we advocate is different: a way to achieve results on a global scale and solve your fundraising challenge without victimizing poor people or despoiling the environment.”  I’m not sure I would agree with the “exploit” statement, but I wholeheartedly agree with this book’s approach and premise of using business techniques to conquer world poverty.

 

The authors make a wonderful point—that this poverty involves “…a horrendous waste of human talent.  How many scientists, physicians, teachers, business innovators, gifted artists, and brilliant community leaders might emerge from the bottom billions if they were freed of the shackles of poverty?”  This poverty causes great environmental damage, which claims the most damage to the poor themselves as they “…over-farm already poor soils, cut down trees for fuel, use local fuels for cooking and heating, and compete for fast-shrinking supplies of water.  Lack of education, high infant mortality, and the need for more hands to increase family income lead to overpopulation, which adds a multiplier effect to the existing pressure that humanity exerts on our dwindling resource base…[with] practically all the projected increase in the world’s population between now and 2050…among people who live on $2 a day or less in the world’s poorest countries.”

 

There is a huge market potential with the emerging economies of the Global South making up approximately $12 trillion or eighteen percent of the globe’s total economic output.  According to the authors, “Global South”  transcends geography and “…refers to the generally less-developed, low-income countries typically classified as ‘developing nations,’ ‘underdeveloped countries,’ and ‘emerging nations—despite the fact that most of India, for example, lies north of the Equator, and Australia and New Zealand, which are by no means underdeveloped, lie far to the south of the line.”  Increasingly, global businesses are coming to realize that their opportunities in developed countries are limited and that it is a matter of corporate growth to seek to serve “…the New Frontier.”  I thoroughly agree with the authors as they wrote, “In business, life is change.  No well-managed corporation with global aspirations can afford to overlook new market opportunities.”

 

To understand the location of the world’s poorest people, the authors explain that most are concentrated in four areas across the globe: the Indian subcontinent (including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, and Sri Lanka)—900 million; Southeast Asia (Myanmar, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, and the Philippines)—700 million; Sub-Saharan Africa (the dozens of nations that lie south of the Arabic-speaking countries on the Mediterranean coast)—roughly 500 million; and China—perhaps 300 million.  These four areas encompass about 2.4 billion with another 300 million spread around the world.

 

The authors sum up their premise, “The remedy we propose is to tap the mainstream capital markets to fund large-scale, global enterprises that address the basic needs of these 2.7 billion people: needs for clean water, renewable energy, affordable housing, accessible health care and education, and, above all, jobs.”  Their approach is founding businesses with a ten year goal of achieving a customer base of 100 million with revenues of $10 billion or more per year profitably enough “…to attract both indigenous and international commercial investors while minimizing its environmental impact to the greatest extent possible.”

 

***

 

The authors have a definite route that they call zero-based design.  The first element of this formula is to listen to the poor people, not through pity, but as customers.  Think like Steve Jobs and create markets.  Scale is an essential component of this plan.  That is, “Design for scale from the very beginning as a central focus of the enterprise, with a view toward reaching not just thousands or even millions of poor people but hundreds of millions.”

 

“Ruthless affordability” requires designing products and processes “…not just 30 to 50 percent less than First World prices but often an order of magnitude less, or 90 percent.”

 

Another crucial key is “private capital.”  It is important to reach generous margins of profit “…which will play a central role in expanding any venture—drawing from a pool of trillions of dollars in private capital rather than the millions typically available for philanthropic; or government-sponsored programs.”  This is a vital point and the key that’s missing in other approaches.

 

The next element is “last-mile distribution.”  Because so many of these potential customers are in isolated rural areas, it is not only critical to plan for the last mile, but often the “last 500 feet.”

 

The authors’ list “aspirational branding” as the next element.  This one surprised me.  We are used to sophisticated branding in the developed world.  But the authors explain this is perhaps even more important with those in the bottom of the pyramid.

 

The final element is “Jugaad innovation.”  The term “Jugaad” is rooted in Hindu and refers to a creative or innovative idea that provides a quick, alternative way of solving or fixing a problem.  This involves working with what you have, and might even be called ingenuity.  Extensive testing and development are crucial.

 

***

 

Both social goals and profitability are important, “For example, if an enterprise adopts the mission of selling crop insurance to large numbers of poor farmers at an attractive price, embeds that mission into its DNA, and never wavers from it, transformative social impact is inevitable.  The real challenge is earning attractive profits while doing it.”  The authors refer to stakeholder-centered management which means that the business addresses the needs of customers, employees, the local communities, the environment and the owners.

Thoughts on the Middle East and Eastern Europe

I’ve spent a lot of my free time reviewing the Middle East chapter in Henry Kissinger’s book World Order. And I’ve realized that the two spots in the world that are most at risk are the Middle East and Eastern Europe.

Henry Kissinger states himself that the Middle East is very complicated both within itself and geopolitically, and I agree. Russia continues to threaten Eastern Europe mainly through the ego and aggressive nature of “President” Putin.

People around the world, including myself, need to improve and work toward wisdom and positive values.

The Middle Eastern radical Muslims have no right or excuse for their outrageous acts—particularly toward women and children. Can the radical Muslims improve, and Putin, too?

The road to peace in the Middle East, as articulated by Prime Minister Lee of Singapore, is to formulate a non-Muslim alliance to back the peaceful Muslims, who in turn would then root out the radical Muslims. As Lee stated, this would not be a quick solution, but of a long-term nature. In the meantime, it is incumbent on the United States to assure that Iran doesn’t get nuclear weapons capabilities.

As far as Russia is concerned, we must use economic sanctions to the utmost, possibly military sanctions, and what is needed to protect Ukraine. Here, it is best to take the advice of Senator John McCain and all our military experts.

Ukraine is a sovereign nation and should not fall into the tyranny of Putin, partly because if it does, he will not stop there. Putin is a murderer and cannot be trusted. He’s dangerous to the world order, but especially to the Eastern European order.

We need a containment policy for Putin. Hopefully and prayerfully, it could be non-violent, using diplomacy, sanctions, and protests, but if worse comes to worst, military strength to stop the tide of Putin’s aggression may be necessary. However, this is a last resort, and we should exhaust all other possibilities before going this route.

Love for oneself, others, and God must dominate our peaceful lives. Gandhi stated, “Violence begets violence.” I fully agree. But I also say that kindness begets kindness.

Love is basic, to within, to without, and to and from God.

Radical Islam is based on the “sword” of hate because the person doesn’t “believe” as that Muslim.

But I deeply believe it is what you say and do that counts with God. So killing, raping, or otherwise abusing people who don’t accept the Muslim faith—Sunni or Shia—is simply not in God’s plan.

Our values support our actions, and our spiritual beliefs support our values and our actions.

I don’t believe God Almighty has a big ego. What He/She wants is for us to do the right things. That would be motivated by love, love within, love without, and God’s enduring, steadfast love.

Love is kind—it says so in the Bible. And love is so much more.

REVIEW Part I: The Business Solution to Poverty: Designing Products and Services for Three Billion Customers

The Business Solution to Poverty:

Designing Products and Services for Three Billion Customers

By Paul Polak and Mal Walwick

Review By John E. Wade II

Part I

 

This is a book that cries out to those of all ages who want meaning and purpose in their life.  The goal is simple—bring out of poverty those 2.7 billion people who live on $2 or less per day.  As the authors graphically and specifically point out—this is far from easy.  But, think about it, what in life of great importance is easily accomplished?

The book itself points out some of its potential readers: entrepreneurs or investors seeking practical ways to profit from new enterprises in emerging markets, executives at major global corporations who want to address the potential customers at the bottom of the pyramid, development practitioners in government, nonprofits, the United Nations or other such organization, philanthropists and investors who want to challenge world poverty, and concerned world citizens everywhere.

I agree heartedly with one of the first statements by the authors, “…we believe that the greatest potential for reducing poverty in today’s global environment lies in the power of business.”  These 2.7 billion people “…constitute an enormous untapped market.”  Estimates are that these people have collective purchasing power of $5 trillion and that as they move out of poverty that figure will double and triple.  These poverty stricken people will be tomorrow’s middle class; and the authors state categorically, “Approaching the problem from the top down has almost never worked…”

I have written below a long review with lots of direct quotes because I have gotten permission to do so and because the book is so well written and simply worded that paraphrasing didn’t seem necessary or appropriate.  For those who want to get a summary of the book/book review, here are the book’s “Takeaways,” with a bit of commentary from me.

  1. “We believe there is one sure way, and only one way, to foster genuine social change on a large scale among the world’s poverty-stricken billions—by harnessing the power of business to the task.”  I fervently agree.
  1. “Conventional approaches to end poverty have largely failed, and as Einstein taught us, to continue believing they’ll succeed would be madness.”  I agree with their point that conventional approaches have largely failed.  But I must say I disagree with Albert Einstein. Being persistent in repeating the same approach to a human problem oftentimes is the only way to eventually succeed.
  1. “The most obvious, direct, and effective way to combat poverty is to help poor people earn more money.”  This may sound simplistic, but earning money can lead to sustainability whereas money through government or charity leads to low self-esteem and is very uncertain in the long term.
  1. “Although a handful of development initiatives have succeeded in improving the livelihoods of as many as 20 million poor people, none has yet reached significant scale.”  This is a major and overriding point in this book.
  1. “Poor people have to invest their own time and money to move out of poverty.”  Giveaways don’t work in the long term, for sure.
  1. “The Don’t Bother Trilogy: If you don’t understand the problem you’ve set out to solve from your customers’ perspective, if your product or service won’t dramatically increase their income, and if you can’t sell 100 million of them, don’t bother.”  Scale is critical for global success.
  1. “To meet the biggest challenge in development—scale—your enterprise must aim to transform the lives of 5 million customers during the first 5 years and 100 million during the first 10.”  I like the idea of having definite large-scale goals.
  1. “Zero-based design requires that you begin from scratch, without preconceptions or existing models to guide you, beginning with your goal in mind—a global enterprise that will attract at least 100 million customers and $10 billion in annual sales within a decade, operating in a way that’s calculated to transform the lives of all your customers.
  1. “In designing products that will open up new markets among the world’s poor, ruthless affordability is the single most important objective.”  This is a huge challenge with a simple goal, but very hard to do.  However, since we are in the Innovation Age, I believe that we can do it.
  1. “Design for extreme affordability rarely comes easily.  Making anything both workable and cheap may take years of careful, incremental adaptation and revision.”
  1. “Designing a branding and marketing strategy and a last-mile supply chain that will put your product or service in the hands of millions of customers is three-quarters of the design challenge.”  This is a big problem in rural areas in particular.
  1. “To achieve true scale, pick a problem that challenges the lives of a billion people.”  This avoids a focus that is too small to defeat world poverty.
  1. “The product or service you plan to commercialize must be culturally independent.”  This allows scale country to country.  The economics of scale is one of the key factors that allowed Henry Ford to lower the price of automobiles to make them affordable for average people.  Volume of production will be a key to allowing this bottom pyramid to be able to afford the products envisioned by this book.
  1. “A brilliant rich-country executive—or even an upper-class executive from the Global South—may be totally out of his or her element working with poor people.”  To major corporations that I hope will heed this call, this may be a crucial consideration.
  1. “Manufacturing at scale is possible through distributed (decentralized) production facilities only if parts or modules are precisely machined to near-zero tolerances and available space and the sequence of steps on the assembly line has been optimized.”  I encourage you to read the whole book, including the case studies which I did not review, to comprehend this “Takeaway.”
  1. “One of the greatest impediments to achieving scale is the high cost of delivering products and services, not just the ‘last mile,’ but the last 500 feet.”  This is particularly true in rural areas where so many of those living on $2 or less per day reside.
  1. “Decentralization is one of the keys to building a large, transnational business capable of making headway against global poverty while turning a generous profit.”  Remember that profits are necessary to create sustainability and scale.
  1. “A business that practices stakeholder-centered management can maximize the chances that it will not just survive but flourish over the long term.”  I agree completely.
  1. “Striving for the lowest possible environmental impact is smart business.”  I believe climate change is one of the top problems of our planet and I’m certainly not the only one who has that view.
  1. “To thrive over the long term, a business must optimize its most valuable asset—its people and the intellectual property they produce—by ensuring that they are well paid, treated with respect, engaged in building their own careers, and given ample opportunities to find meaning and balance in their jobs.”  All the people in and out of our businesses globally should be treated with dignity, respect, and kindness.

Globalization and World Order

As I’ve been saying, I am reading and reviewing World Order by Henry Kissinger, taking time to handwrite quotations and comments in great detail. If I could only merge How to Achieve a Heaven on Earth and Glimpses of Heaven on Earth, as well as all my ideas and blogs on those subjects, with Henry Kissinger’s book.

He states that there has never been world order, but we desperately need it. I fervently agree. It’s sort of like optimism meeting pessimism. I understand his point of view since he is a historian, as well as a National Securities Council member, was secretary of state for two presidents, and was an advisor for others. He’s seen wars, and I’m sure he wants to end them.

I believe one of the keys to end war is globalization. China and the United States were once adversaries, but now we are trading partners. It’s not a perfect relationship, but it’s one that can flow into greater and greater cooperation.

India is another bright spot of over a billion people that can grow in trade and all kinds of mutually beneficial endeavors.

Russia is a corrupt troublemaker, and as long as President Putin reigns, it’s likely to stay that way.

The Middle East—largely due to President Obama and Secretary Clinton—has huge geopolitical and regional problems. President Obama should have left a stability force in Iraq to preserve their fledgling democracy, just as America did in Germany and Japan after World War II.

Read Ronald Reagan’s Wisdom for the Twenty-First Century. Reagan certainly had vision, and was able to accomplish so much. Henry Kissinger gives him a large part of the credit for ending the Cold War. He also invigorated our economy for twenty-five years. His basic approach was to lower taxes and regulations. That formula will work again.

RTC,MP,JohnWadeandGeorgeWhite,20Sep.2015

Football and Politics

RTC,MP,JohnWadeandGeorgeWhite,20Sep.2015I attended the New Orleans Saint’s game Sunday, a heartbreaker loss (we’re now 0-2) against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. I then proceeded to spend a brief period at the Round Table Club where I briefly spoke with George White (pictured here), a long-time Republican power and friend.

RT314A~1Then I had dinner and gathered up my Henry Kissinger review of World Order. I plan to finish it in Chicago in draft form. I will have to receive special permission to use the review because I did not try to paraphrase; I’m just trying to pull out the important parts and give my comments and analysis.RTC,BookClub,21Sep.2015

Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin is a WINNER

Yes, Scott Walker has won three gubernatorial elections at higher margins each time. Wisconsin is a blue state won by President Obama in 2008 and 2012. Nevertheless, one of the governor’s wins was a first in U.S. history—a victory in a recall election, at a higher margin of victory than his original race.

No doubt about it, Governor Scott Walker is a winner with proven courage, leadership and innovation. Republicans have a deep bench of candidates, any of whom could be competent presidents in ordinary times. But now we direly need courage, leadership and innovation such as Governor Walker and President Reagan have shown. Can Governor Walker do it on the national level? No one knows for sure, but among all the candidates, he is the only one who has proven credentials in these three vital qualities.

Read my review of his book Unintimidated. Governor Walker faced death threats to him, his family and fellow Republican legislators and their families when fighting the unions. He innovated when abolishing collective bargaining except for pay for fire and police. A fellow Republican told him very directly, “Governor, you can’t do this”, but they did it; they turned a $3.6 billion deficit into a surplus, allowed all schools to become charter schools, in short allowed the government to operate like a business, not a union shop that prizes their union dues over students, teachers and fiscal soundness.

Get the whole story. By the way, the unemployment rate in Wisconsin is now down to 4.6 and taxes have been lowered whereas they had previously been chronically raised.

Let’s elect a winner in 2016—Scott Walker!

American flag

The Dire Need for Governor Scott Walker as our 2016 Presidential Winner

I did say winner, because Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin is a superb winner. His courageous leadership, honesty, and innovative nature, along with his local-level, legislative, and governorship qualities and experience absolutely shine. These same qualities will shine if Scott Walker is elected as our next president.

Governor Walker, as a conservative republican, has won three gubernatorial elections in the last four years in a blue state that President Obama carried in both 2008 and 2012. This includes a recall election won by a larger margin than the initial election—the first governor in U.S. history to win a recall election.

How is Governor Walker such a winner? One example was his decisive action and courage in eliminating bargaining entitlements—by fighting the unions—to increase efficiency, fiscal flexibility, and effectiveness of schools and state government. By gaining flexibility without those entitlements—a great innovation—he was able to save jobs and lower taxes…and …much more.

Scott Walker can win the presidency in 2016 and rescue us from the damage of the Obama-led democratic disaster, through his genuine, honest, wise, and capable leadership. If you’d like to know more about Governor Scott Walker, I encourage you to read my review of his book, Unintimidated: A Governor’s Story and a Nation’s Challenge.